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Forum » Real HIP HOP Forever » General Hip Hop Discussion » Why Is Hip Hop Preservation Important To You? (Get Involved In The Discussion!)
Why Is Hip Hop Preservation Important To You?
eboyd Date: Thursday, 25/Apr/13, 12:04 PM | Message # 1

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So I'm bringing this discussion from Facebook over here. Please, if you comment here, post your response there as well. Read through the comment section a bit, and look at the second question i posed in the comment section as well before commenting. Thanks!:

http://www.facebook.com/Realhiphopforever/posts/576302345723050


my new theme song



erikboyd60@hotmail.com

"True poetry can communicate before it is understood"

-T.S. Eliot

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NtG Date: Saturday, 27/Apr/13, 9:30 AM | Message # 2

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I apologize in advance for this, it’s kind of hard for me to get my thoughts into words.

Honestly, it used to be important to me, like 2-3 years ago, but it really isn’t anymore. Hip-hop in it’s truest form will always be underground, and pop variants of hip-hop and other genres will always be at the top of charts, that is just how it is and you will never be able to change that. Hip-hop isn’t dying, so I don’t understand the notion of “preserving it”, and whether you guys like it or not (I am guessing not, by the ratings of Cole World on here) there are a ton of mainstream artists who also make real hip-hop songs.

One of the things I can’t stand about the “real hip-hop” community is that all of the artists who do “real hip-hop”, most of their songs are about how real hip-hop is dying. I don’t want to hear a billion songs of people bitching about how record labels killed hip-hop. That’s bullshit. Supply and demand booted what you deem as real hip-hop out of the mainstream.

I see a lot of “real hip-hop heads” complain that today’s “rap” music is only about sex, drugs, violence, and money, but then turn right around and praise 90’s rap songs which were also mostly about sex, drugs, violence, and money. Ridiculous. The only thing that has changed between these two eras is the beats (lots of 808s now).

“So far the most common theme I seem to be getting is that real hip hop represents two main things: 1. The realities surrounding those of us that represent it, and 2. A level of intellect and critical thought.”

“If an artist you don't like made a song that fit the criteria stated above, whether or not you personally liked how it sounded, could that song be considered real hip hop, even though the artist isn't?”

I hope that everyone answers this question as “yes”, otherwise you’re on some gay hipster shit. I don’t care who makes a song, if it’s good I will listen to it.

If an artist you like makes something that doesn't fit this criteria, does that make them no longer a real hip hopper?

No.

Do your thing, don’t care what other people think, and vice a versa.


I>U
Adam Date: Sunday, 28/Apr/13, 1:17 AM | Message # 3

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Sound is vibration. That's it.




I JUST EXPLODED INTO RAINBOWS AND LOLLIPOPS!
EmSeeD Date: Sunday, 28/Apr/13, 6:32 AM | Message # 4

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I love and respect the art form so of course I want to see it live on. Hip Hop also plays a big part beyond that too, Hip Hop is like the voice of 'the other side' the common people and its important that this voice is heard. Hip Hop can save lives, Hip Hop can reach out where other's can't. Thats what its done for me, I would be lost as fuck if it wasn't for Hip Hop.

Quote (Adam)
Sound is vibration. That's it.


But Hip Hop isn't just a sound or music, its a culture and a way people live. I think that culture is changing though, I don't think thats really a bad thing though. I don't like how some Hip Hop heads hate on people for wearing skinny jeans and shit, nothing wrong with those man, fashion in Hip Hop has always been changing, emcee's in the 90's didn't dress like emcee's from the 80's, they came up with their own new styles.

Honestly I do it simply because I enjoy it. There are good lyricists out there who make great music, but its getting harder and harder for them to be heard, even in the underground now. Thats why I stay with this site, because their music deserves to be heard, so I try to promote it

Quote
1. The realities surrounding those of us that represent it, and 2. A level of intellect and critical thought.

Quote
If an artist you don't like made a song that fit the criteria stated above, whether or not you personally liked how it sounded, could that song be considered real hip hop, even though the artist isn't?


I think its if the artist identifies themselves as Hip Hop and live, understand and respect the culture that makes them Hip Hop, not what songs they make, so no.


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eboyd Date: Sunday, 28/Apr/13, 9:10 AM | Message # 5

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How does one determine if an artist understands and respects the culture?

my new theme song



erikboyd60@hotmail.com

"True poetry can communicate before it is understood"

-T.S. Eliot

battle record:

7-0-0

Menace Date: Sunday, 28/Apr/13, 6:09 PM | Message # 6

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isn't hip hop a subculture? not just music? because it is a subculture, and a subculture creates around it a set of ideas, mannerisms, values, MUSIC etc. and the way things are going nowadays, hip hop as a subculture is indeed dying, even if pop music incorporated some elements of it.

but this is the case with all subcultures, from punk and what not. so this is a self preserving movement in a way. what can judge hip hop is what impact had and has, and until now I think it had a positive impact, on a social level at least, so its worth preserving and helping others with it.


Adam Date: Monday, 29/Apr/13, 4:31 AM | Message # 7

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Many people do not know that hip hop transcends the beat and rhyme, are they at a loss for not knowing? Is some fool misrepresenting hip hop culture, hurting it? I don't think anyone can endanger hip hop, since it has and always will be forever. To me nothing can match hip hop as a sound. No other genre can be as versatile and as accessible as hip hop. That is what I love. However, I can not lie and say that the culture has affected me greatly, or in some positive way because it really hasn't.

Perhaps I was never in the right time or place to witness the culture of hip hop in action.





I JUST EXPLODED INTO RAINBOWS AND LOLLIPOPS!


Message edited by Adam - Monday, 29/Apr/13, 4:36 AM
Menace Date: Monday, 29/Apr/13, 4:47 PM | Message # 8

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Quote (Adam)
Perhaps I was never in the right time or place to witness the culture of hip hop in action.


That could be. Because for many of us, it affected us in a way that made us choose other courses in life, better courses that ultimately saved our lives. Not many musical subcultures did that on a social level to people. So even for its educational and help value, I think this culture needs to be at least promoted.

Quote (Adam)
Is some fool misrepresenting hip hop culture, hurting it?


Of course, commercialization means commodification, that killing the art form and its culture, and creating in into a mass product, to be consumed as meat in the detriment of its positive elements. This happened to all musical subcultures, because its a element of our economic system, you create something, but when you commercialize it for consume, for economic purposes, you leave many aspects of it, to fit and sell, which can be a good thing, but in a long term, its really not.


EmSeeD Date: Wednesday, 01/May/13, 4:36 AM | Message # 9

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Quote (eboyd)
How does one determine if an artist understands and respects the culture?


I guess knowledge of the elements and the pioneers, respect for the elements. If they really do these things in real life like graffiti, emcee etc or are often around people who do, like a community

Also I think its important to acknowledge Hip Hop came from the under class people, the poor urban neighbourhoods, I think these are the "Hip Hop people"


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ilikebacon3000 Date: Thursday, 02/May/13, 0:24 AM | Message # 10

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Cultures die out. I mean in 82, the street punk thing was alive and thriving, but now most street punkers with jackets and mo-hawks get seen as "out of touch" and shit. Bboy's are not in abundance like they used to be, breakdancing is virtually dead outside of hiphop circles (then again I might be wrong, I don't follow dancing very much). Graffiti has developed into a culture of it's own. It spawned from hiphop, and there was a time when people saw it and connected to it to trains, the inner city, crime, hiphop music, gangs, etc. Now it is widely seen as an art form, people don't look down on it as much. I think vandalizing something that isn't yours is kind of lame, but hey, the world sucks. You can paint over it.
Rapping itself is alive and well, but like Adam said, alot of people don't realize that hiphop transcends rhyming on a song.
Fashion? Psh. The fashion element is a whole other discussion, and "hiphop fashion" is a term used so vaguely now that it could mean anything.
I am past the entire "keep it alive" deal, because like punk music, some stuff just can't be changed and the population will not be swayed.
As a whole, true hiphop culture is dead, but that doesn't mean I don't still enjoy hiphop music, or admire a tagger's mark on a street sign, or something.


Life's a bitch and I'm just along for the ride.
Forum » Real HIP HOP Forever » General Hip Hop Discussion » Why Is Hip Hop Preservation Important To You? (Get Involved In The Discussion!)
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